INGUINAL AND ABDOMINAL HERNIA

INGUINAL AND ABDOMINAL HERNIA


An inguinal hernia occurs when tissue, such as part of the intestine, protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal muscles. The resulting bulge can be painful, especially when you cough, bend over or lift a heavy object.
An inguinal hernia isn’t necessarily dangerous. It doesn’t improve on its own, however, and can lead to life-threatening complications. Your doctor is likely to recommend surgery to fix an inguinal hernia that’s painful or enlarging. Inguinal hernia repair is a common surgical procedure.

Symptoms
Inguinal hernia signs and symptoms include:
*A bulge in the area on either side of your pubic bone, which becomes more obvious when you’re upright, especially if you cough or strain
*A burning or aching sensation at the bulge
*Pain or discomfort in your groin, especially when bending over, coughing or lifting
*A heavy or dragging sensation in your groin
*Weakness or pressure in your groin
*Occasionally, pain and swelling around the testicles when the protruding intestine descends into the scrotum

Signs and symptoms in children
Inguinal hernias in newborns and children result from a weakness in the abdominal wall that’s present at birth. Sometimes the hernia will be visible only when an infant is crying, coughing or straining during a bowel movement. He or she might be irritable and have less appetite than usual.
In an older child, a hernia is likely to be more apparent when the child coughs, strains during a bowel movement or stands for a long period.